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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 629–639 | Cite as

Skin surface microflora of the saddle-back tamarin monkey,Saguinus fuscicollis

  • Katrina M. Nordstrom
  • Anne M. Belcher
  • Gisela Epple
  • Kay L. Greenfield
  • James J. Leyden
  • Amos B. SmithIII
Article

Abstract

The resident skin surface microflora of 12 male and three femaleSaguinus fuscicollis was studied. The suprapubic-circumgenital gland surface and the perirectal area were most heavily colonized (106–108 colony forming units/cm2), but high numbers of organisms were also present on the abdomen, the sternal gland surface, and palms and plantar surfaces. Bacteria were also recovered from hair clippings as well as from shaven skin surface, although at much lower densities (102–104 colony forming units/cm2). Coagulase negative staphylococci, gram-negative bacteria,Streptococcus species and coryneform bacteria were most dominant.Staphylococcus aureus and species ofBacillus were also present. Fungi, yeast, and dermatophytes were infrequently recovered or completely absent. The microbial flora of these tamarins appears to be closely associated with the secretions of the circumgenital scent gland and would therefore be ideally situated to participate in the generation or modification of chemical signals.

Key words

Saddle-back tamarin Saguinus fuscicollis primates Callitrichidae surface microflora chemical communication 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katrina M. Nordstrom
    • 1
  • Anne M. Belcher
    • 2
  • Gisela Epple
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kay L. Greenfield
    • 2
  • James J. Leyden
    • 1
  • Amos B. SmithIII
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphia
  2. 2.Monell Chemical Senses CenterPhiladelphia
  3. 3.German Primate CenterGöttingenGermany
  4. 4.Department of ChemistryUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia

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