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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 701–712 | Cite as

Coyote estrous urine volatiles

  • Thomas H. Schultz
  • Robert A. Flath
  • Donald J. Stern
  • T. Richard Mon
  • Roy Teranishi
  • Sheila McKenna Kruse
  • Barbara Butler
  • Walter E. Howard
Article

Abstract

Samples of female coyote urine were taken once or twice each week during the winter and spring for two years. Headspace analysis was employed with Tenax GC trapping and GC-MS. Tenax trapping was started in less than 1 hr after sampling, and mild conditions were used to minimize losses of highly volatile and labile compounds. Thirty-four compounds were identified. They include sulfur compounds, aldehydes and ketones, hydrocarbons, and one alcohol. The principal constituent is methyl 3-methylbut-3-enyl sulfide, which usually comprised 50% or more of the total volatiles observed. The concentration of many constituents varied widely. This appeared to be quasiperiodic for five of the constituents, with a period of a few weeks, and with pronounced maxima at the peak of estrus. Apparently these compounds are 3-methyltetrahydrothiophene, methyl 3-methylbutyl sulfide, octanal, dodecanal, and bis(3-methylbut-3-enyl) disulfide. One or more of these compounds may have pheromonal activity in coyote relationships.

Key words

Canidae coyote urine volatiles estrous urine urine volatiles 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas H. Schultz
    • 1
  • Robert A. Flath
    • 1
  • Donald J. Stern
    • 1
  • T. Richard Mon
    • 1
  • Roy Teranishi
    • 1
  • Sheila McKenna Kruse
    • 2
  • Barbara Butler
    • 2
  • Walter E. Howard
    • 2
  1. 1.Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research ServiceU.S. Department of AgricultureAlbany
  2. 2.Department of Wildlife and Fisheries BiologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavis

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