Biofeedback and Self-regulation

, Volume 1, Issue 3, pp 285–292

Relaxation measured by EMG as a function of vibrotactile stimulation

  • D. W. Matheson
  • R. Edelson
  • D. Hiatrides
  • J. Newkirk
  • K. Twinem
  • S. Thurston
Articles

Abstract

The present study investigated the effect of vibrotactile stimulation on relaxation as measured by EMG recording. Forty-eight subjects from three age groups were randomly divided into 8 experimental groups:(1) simultaneous footrest vibration and back vibration(A1C1);(2) simultaneous footrest vibration and back roller(A1C2); (3) simultaneous footrest vibration, back vibration and back roller(A1C3); (4) footrest vibration alone(A1C4); (5) back vibration alone(A2C1); (6) back roller alone(A2C2); (7) simultaneous back vibration and back roller(A2C3); and(8) control group (no vibration/stimulation)(A2C4). The three major variables studied were footrest vibration(A1 andA2), pre- and post-EMG measures(B1 andB2), and back vibration(C1C2C3C4). Results showed that footrest vibration had a significant effect on relaxation. Other conditions (except the control) produced a decrease in EMG levels, but did not reach significance. Pre- and postmeasures by experimental conditions were also significantly different. Application of vibration as an aid in relaxation is discussed.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. W. Matheson
    • 1
  • R. Edelson
    • 1
  • D. Hiatrides
    • 1
  • J. Newkirk
    • 1
  • K. Twinem
    • 1
  • S. Thurston
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of the PacificStockton

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