Biofeedback and Self-regulation

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 223–235 | Cite as

The treatment of psychophysiologic insomnia with biofeedback: A replication study

  • Peter J. Hauri
  • Linda Percy
  • Carla Hellekson
  • Ernest Hartmann
  • Diane Russ
Article

Abstract

To replicate a previous study, 16 psychophysiological insomniacs were randomly assigned to either Theta feedback or sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) feedback. Evaluations by home sleep logs and by 3 nights in the laboratory were done before biofeedback, immediately after biofeedback, and 9 months later. Results from this study replicate previous findings. Both Theta and SMR feedback seemed effective treatments of insomnia according to home sleep logs. According to evaluations at the sleep laboratory, tense and anxious insomniacs benefited only from Theta feedback but not from SMR feedback, while those who were relaxed at intake but still could not sleep benefited only from SMR but not from Theta feedback.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Hauri
    • 1
  • Linda Percy
    • 1
  • Carla Hellekson
    • 1
  • Ernest Hartmann
    • 1
  • Diane Russ
    • 1
  1. 1.Dartmouth Medical School and Tufts UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Dartmouth-Hitchcock Sleep Disorders CenterDartmouth Medical SchoolHanover

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