Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 19, Issue 5, pp 1009–1019 | Cite as

Sex pheromone of the western hemlock looper,Lambdina fiscellaria lugubrosa (Hulst) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae)

  • Gerhard Gries
  • Regine Gries
  • Shân H. Krannitz
  • Jianxiong Li
  • G. G. Skip King
  • Keith N. Slessor
  • John H. Borden
  • Wade W. Bowers
  • Rick J. West
  • Edward W. Underhill
Article

Abstract

The sex pheromone of the western hemlock looper (WHL),Lambdina fiscellaria lugubrosa (Hulst), comprises three methylated hydrocarbons: 5,11-dimethylheptadecane (5,11), 2,5-dimethylheptadecane (2,5), and 7-methylheptadecane (7). Compounds extracted from female pheromone glands were identified by coupled gas chromatographic-electroantennographic (GC-EAD) analysis and coupled GC-mass spectroscopy in selected ion monitoring mode. In trapping experiments, (5,11) alone attracted male moths, but addition of either (7) or (2,5) significantly enhanced attraction. (5,11) combined with both (7) and (2,5) was significantly most attractive. (5,11) and (2,5) are also sex pheromone components of the eastern hemlock looper (EHL),Lambdina fiscellaria fiscellaria (Guen.). Although (7) is produced by the EHL, it is a pheromone component only in the WHL. It constitutes the first behaviorally active monomethyl-branched hydrocarbon to be found in a geometrid and is a novel lepidopteran sex pheromone component. The different 2- versus 3-component sex pheromone supports taxonomic division of EHL and WHL.

Key Words

Lepidoptera Geometridae Lambdina fiscellaria fiscellaria Lambdina fiscellaria lugubrosa sex pheromone 5,11-dimethylheptadecane 2,5-dimethylheptadecane 7-methylheptadecane 5-methylheptadecane 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerhard Gries
    • 1
  • Regine Gries
    • 1
  • Shân H. Krannitz
    • 2
  • Jianxiong Li
    • 3
  • G. G. Skip King
    • 3
  • Keith N. Slessor
    • 3
  • John H. Borden
    • 1
  • Wade W. Bowers
    • 4
  • Rick J. West
    • 4
  • Edward W. Underhill
    • 5
  1. 1.Centre for Pest Management, Department of Biological SciencesSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Phero Tech Inc.DeltaCanada
  3. 3.Department of ChemistrySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  4. 4.Forestry Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador RegionSt. John'sCanada
  5. 5.VictoriaCanada

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