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Research in Higher Education

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 23–40 | Cite as

The relationship between perceived learning and satisfaction with college: An alternative view

  • Gary R. Pike
AIR Forum Issue

Abstract

Student and alumni reports of learning and development during college play an important role in research on educational outcomes. An intriguing finding of this research is the positive relationship between perceived learning and satisfaction with college. While studies have documented an association between perceptions of learning and satisfaction, the nature of the relationship is not clearly defined. This study evaluates two competing models of perceived learning and satisfaction. The first model represents a true relationship between learning and satisfaction, while the second treats the relationship as an artifact of a halo effect. Data came from subjects who completed learning and satisfaction questions as seniors and again two years after graduation. Analyses revealed that treating the learning-satisfaction relationship as an artifact of a halo effect provided the best representation of the data. Although not conclusive, results suggested that educational researchers and assessment practitioners should be careful in interpreting self-reports of learning and development, particularly as they relate to satisfaction with college.

Keywords

Positive Relationship Education Research Good Representation Educational Outcome Alternative View 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary R. Pike
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Educational AssessmentUniversity of Missouri-ColumbiaColumbia

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