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Research in Higher Education

, Volume 34, Issue 1, pp 1–10 | Cite as

On the nature of institutional research and the knowledge and skills it requires

  • Patrick T. Terenzini
AIR Forum Issue

Abstract

This paper offers a conception of institutional research as comprising three tiers of organizational intelligence. The first tier, technical and analytical intelligence, requires familiarity with the basic analytical processes of institutional research. The second tier, issues intelligence, requires knowledge of substantive institutional management issues in four areas: students, faculty, finances, and facilities. The third tier, contextual intelligence, requires understanding of the history and culture of higher education in general and of the particular campus on which one works. The kinds of knowledge and skills required at each level are also discussed, as are the ways in which each form of intelligence is acquired.

Keywords

High Education Analytical Process Education Research Management Issue Institutional Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick T. Terenzini
    • 1
  1. 1.National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, Learning and AssessmentThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity Park

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