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Motivation and Emotion

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 279–290 | Cite as

A contrast effect in judgments of own emotional state

  • A. S. R. Manstead
  • H. L. Wagner
  • C. J. MacDonald
Article

Abstract

Subjects rated their emotional responses to scenes from two contrasting types of audiovisual material (comedy and horror), the order or presentation being either comedy-horror or horror-comedy. Feelings of pleasantness and relaxation, together with ratings of the funniness of comedy scenes, were enhanced when subjects viewed the comedy scenes having previously viewed the horror scenes. Similarly, horror scenes were rated as more frightening and induced more unpleasant feelings when subjects had previously viewed the comedy scenes. This contrast effect in emotional response is discussed in relation to other studies of the effects of emotion on judgments. A number of theoretical approaches are considered in attempting to explain the findings.

Keywords

Social Psychology Theoretical Approach Emotional State Emotional Response Contrast Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. S. R. Manstead
    • 1
  • H. L. Wagner
    • 1
  • C. J. MacDonald
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ManchesterManchesterEngland

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