Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 4, Issue 6, pp 649–655 | Cite as

Behavioral responses of the female eastern spruce budwormChoristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) to the sex pheromone of her own species

  • P. Palanaswamy
  • W. D. Seabrook
Article

Abstract

Female eastern spruce budworm moths respond to the synthetic sex pheromone of their own species (a mixture ofcis- andtrans-11-tetradecenal) by walking, antennal grooming, flexation of the body, extension of the ovipositors, and oviposition. The sex pheromone is perceived by receptors on the antennae. Electroantennogram responses from the female are approximately two-thirds the amplitude of those obtained from males.

Key words

Spruce budworm Choristoneura fumiferana pheromone female behavior electroantennogram dispersal 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Palanaswamy
    • 1
  • W. D. Seabrook
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of New BrunswickFrederictonCanada

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