Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 67–84 | Cite as

Field response of the dutch elm disease vectors,Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham) andS. scolytus (F.) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) to 4-methyl-3-heptanol baits containing α-, β-,δ-, or δ-multistriatin

  • Margaret M. Blight
  • N. J. Fielding
  • C. J. King
  • A. P. Ottridge
  • L. J. Wadhams
  • M. J. Wenham
Article

Abstract

The field responses of English populations of the Dutch elm disease vectors,Scolytus multistriatus andS. scolytus to baits containing 4-methyl-3-heptanol, a host synergist [(−)-α-cubebene or (−)-limonene] and (±)-α-, (+)-β-, (−)-β-, (±)-γ-, or (±)-δ-multistriatin were examined. (±)-α-Multistriatin, released at 5–10 μg/day, enhanced the response ofS. multistriatus to baits containing 4-methyl-3-heptanol and either of the host synergists but had no effect on the capture ofS. scolytus. The release of larger amounts (57 or 365 μg/day) of (±)-α-multistriatin interrupted the response of both species to the 4-methyl-3-heptanol baits. It appears that α-multistriatin has multiple functions as a behavior-modifying substance for the two beetles. The (+)-β-, (−)-β-, (±)-γ-, and (±)-δ-multistriatins were inactive when released at 5–10 μg/day. The results of these field experiments suggest that one bait can be formulated to capture both species.

Key words

Scolytus multistriatus S. scolytus Coleoptera Scolytidae elm bark beetle multistriatin stereoisomers Dutch elm disease aggregation pheromone field responses attractant baits 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret M. Blight
    • 1
  • N. J. Fielding
    • 2
  • C. J. King
    • 2
  • A. P. Ottridge
    • 1
  • L. J. Wadhams
    • 1
  • M. J. Wenham
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Research Council Unit of Invertebrate Chemistry and PhysiologyUniversity of Sussex FalmerBrightonEngland
  2. 2.Forestry Commission Research StationFarnhamEngland

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