Political Behavior

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 391–401 | Cite as

Activating voters in congressional elections

  • Gary W. Copeland
Article

Abstract

This paper shows that one of the consequences of electoral campaigns is activation. Much research in the last decade has shown that campaign spending is related to electoral outcomes, but nearly all of this research has been conducted on district-level data, so we do not know how campaigns influence individual voters. This research returns to the theoretical framework offered inThe People's Choice and shows that at least part of the effect of campaigns is due to the increased likelihood of people voting when campaigns are more intense.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Burnham, Walter Dean (1965). “The Changing Shape of the American Political Universe.”American Political Science Review 59:7–28.Google Scholar
  2. Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report (1975). 33:790–794.Google Scholar
  3. Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report (1977). 35:2305–2311.Google Scholar
  4. Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report (1979). 37:543.Google Scholar
  5. Copeland, Gary W., and Samuel C. Patterson (1977). “Reform of Congressional Campaign Spending.”Policy Studies Journal 5:424–432.Google Scholar
  6. Dawson, Paul, and James E. Zinser (1971). “Broadcast Expenditures and Electoral Outcomes in the 1970 Congressional Election.”Public Opinion Quarterly 35:398–402.Google Scholar
  7. Dawson, Paul, and James E. Zinser (1976). “Political Finance and Participation in Congressional Elections.”The Annals 425:59–73.Google Scholar
  8. Glantz, Stanton A., Alan I. Abramowitz, and Michael P. Burkhart (1976). “Election Outcomes: Whose Money Matters.”Journal of Politics 38:1033–1038.Google Scholar
  9. Jacobson, Gary C. (1978). “The Effects of Campaign Spending in Congressional Elections.”American Political Science Review 72:469–491.Google Scholar
  10. Jacobson, Gary C. (1980).Money in Congressional Elections. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Jacobson, Gary C., and Samuel Kernell (1981)Strategy and Choice in Congressional Elections. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Kmenta, Jan (1971).Elements of Econometrics. New York: MacMillan.Google Scholar
  13. Lazarsfeld, Paul F., Bernard Berelson, and Hazel Gaudet (1944).The People's Choice. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Mann, Thomas E. (1978).Unsafe at Any Margin. Washington, D. C.: American Enterprise Institute.Google Scholar
  15. Nimmo, Dan (1970).The Political Persuaders. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  16. Ornstein, Norman J., Thomas E. Mann, Michael J. Malbin, and John F. Bibby (1982).Vital Statistics on Congress, 1982. Washington, D. C.: American Enterprise Institute.Google Scholar
  17. Pindyck, Robert S., and Daniel L. Rubinfeld (1976).Econometric Models and Economic Forecasts. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Agathon Press, Inc 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary W. Copeland
    • 1
  1. 1.Carl Albert Congressional Research and Studies Center and Department of Political ScienceUniversity of OklahomaUSA

Personalised recommendations