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Journal of Nonverbal Behavior

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 163–175 | Cite as

Lying and nonverbal behavior: Theoretical issues and new findings

  • Paul Ekman
Article

Abstract

Conceptual issues about deceit, in specific why lies fail and when and how behavior may betray a lie, provides the basis for considering the type of experimental situations which may be fruitful for the study of deceit. New evidence, integrating past reports with new unpublished findings, compare the relative efficacy of facial, bodily, vocal, paralinguistic and textual measures in discriminating deceptive from honest behavior. The findings show also that most people do not rely upon the most useful sources of information in judging whether someone is lying.

Keywords

Social Psychology Experimental Situation Relative Efficacy Nonverbal Behavior Theoretical Issue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Ekman
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Interaction LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaSan Francisco

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