Political Behavior

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 114–125 | Cite as

Do voters really care about political parties anymore? A response to Craig

  • Martin P. Wattenberg
Article

Abstract

In response to a critique of his work by Stephen C. Craig (1985), the author marshals additional evidence that in regard to the relationship between voters and the two major parties in the U.S., it is not so much that people's confidence in the parties has eroded, but rather that the prominence of individual candidates has turned voters' attention away from the parties, making their attitudes toward the parties neutral rather than negative.

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References

  1. Converse, Philip E., and Markus, Gregory B. (1979). Plus ca change... The New CPS Election Study Panel.American Political Science Review 73: 32–49.Google Scholar
  2. Craig, Stephen C. (1985). The decline of partisanship in the United States: A re-examination of the neutrality hypothesis.Political Behavior 7: 57–78.Google Scholar
  3. Keith, Bruce, Magleby, David B., Nelson, Candice J., Orr, Elizabeth, Westlye, Mark C., and Wolfinger, Raymond E. (1986). The partisan attitudes of independent “leaners.”British Journal of Political Science 16: 155–186.Google Scholar
  4. Jennings, M. Kent, and Markus, Gregory B. (1984). Partisan orientations over the long haul: Results from the three-wave political socialization study.American Political Science Review 78: 1000–1018.Google Scholar
  5. Wattenberg, Martin P. (1984).The Decline of American Political Parties, 1952–1980. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Wattenberg, Martin P. (1986).The Decline of American Political Parties, 1952–1984. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Agathon Press, Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin P. Wattenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social ScienceUniversity of CaliforniaIrvine

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