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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 5, Issue 5, pp 663–671 | Cite as

A quantitative feeding bioassay forPissodes strobi Peck (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

  • R. I. Alfaro
  • H. D. PierceJr.
  • J. H. Borden
  • A. C. Oehlschlager
Article

Abstract

A feeding bioassay forPissodes strobi Peck was developed that consisted of plastic petri dishes containing paired agar disks immersed in paraffin wax. Lens paper covering the top surface of the disks provided 1, 2, or 3 weevils in each replicate with a surface through which they made regular feeding punctures which could be easily counted. The number of feeding punctures was correlated with the amount of agar ingested. Candidate feeding stimulants or deterrents were applied to the paper covering one of the disks in the dishes, while the other served as a solvent control. Feeding stimulants were tested using disks of pure agar, and deterrents were assayed on agar disks that contained 2% ground, dried Sitka spruce bark,Picea sitchensis Carr. The weevils exhibited a concentration-dependent response to the amount of spruce bark in the agar disk. Feeding stimulation by Sitka spruce bark extracts, and deterrency by leaf oil of western red cedar,Thuja plicata Donn, was demonstrated. The bioassay would be useful in chemical isolation programs aimed at identification of feeding stimulants and deterrents.

Key words

Pissodes strobi Coleoptera Curculionidae picea sitchensis Carr. Thuja plicata Donn feeding bioassay feeding deterrents feeding stimulants 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. I. Alfaro
    • 1
  • H. D. PierceJr.
    • 2
  • J. H. Borden
    • 1
  • A. C. Oehlschlager
    • 2
  1. 1.Pestology Centre, Department of Biological SciencesSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Department of ChemistrySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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