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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 19, Issue 7, pp 1381–1391 | Cite as

Unusual periodicity of sex pheromone production in the large black chaferHolotrichia parallela

  • Walter S. Leal
  • Masaaki Sawada
  • Shigeru Matsuyama
  • Yasumasa Kuwahara
  • Makoto Hasegawa
Article

Abstract

(R)-(−)-Linalool was identified as a minor component sex pheromone of the scarab beetleHolotrichia parallela (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Field evaluations revealed that, although not attractive per se, (R)-(−)-linalool enhances the attractiveness of the major sex pheromone,L-isoleucine methyl ester (LIME). Analyses of the pheromone titers in the glands of field-collected females demonstrated the occurrence of peak levels of 48-hr (“circabidian”) periodicity. The levels of LIME in the glands of 45-day-old virgin females increased over three times from the scototo the photophase of a calling day, but the amounts of (R)-(−)-linalool did not significantly change. Virgin females had in average two times more LIME and 3.6 times more (R)-(−)-linalool than the average amount found in the field-captured beetles throughout the season.

Key Words

Holotrichia parallela large black chafer scarab beetle Coleoptera Scarabaeidae isoleucine methyl ester linalool sex pheromone circabidian periodicity pheromone titer 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter S. Leal
    • 1
  • Masaaki Sawada
    • 2
  • Shigeru Matsuyama
    • 3
  • Yasumasa Kuwahara
    • 3
  • Makoto Hasegawa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Insect Physiology and BehaviorNational Institute of Sericultural and Entomological ScienceIbarakiJapan
  2. 2.Chiba Prefectural Agricultural Experiment StationChibaJapan
  3. 3.Institute of Applied BiochemistryUniversity of TsukubaIbarakiJapan

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