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Journal of World Prehistory

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 71–120 | Cite as

Monongahela subsistence-settlement change: The late prehistoric period in the lower Upper Ohio River valley

  • John P. Hart
Article

Abstract

The Late Prehistoric period in the lower Upper Ohio River basin of southwestern Pennsylvania and adjacent portions of Maryland, Ohio, and West Virginia is dominated by a material-culture assemblage named Monongahela. Monongahela has been associated with subsistence-settlement systems that included a large number of upland villages that were often far removed from large river valleys. The existence of these villages has been explained as resulting from intra- and interregional warfare. While these upland villages may have obtained as a result of warfare, it is argued that they served as important links in regional divided risk strategies in response to local environmental and social risks.

Key Words

Late Prehistoric Period Monongahela Upper Ohio River subsistence-settlement change 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John P. Hart
    • 1
  1. 1.GAI Consultants, Inc.Monroeville

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