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Journal of World Prehistory

, Volume 6, Issue 4, pp 385–440 | Cite as

The Middle Stone Age south of the Limpopo River

  • Anne I. Thackeray
Article

Abstract

Current interest in the origins of anatomically modernHomo sapiens has focused attention on early modern human remains and related archaeological materials associated with the southern African Middle Stone Age. While the anatomically modern status and a Last Interglacial or later age for the human fossils enjoy general support, issues related to the definition of the Middle Stone Age, its dating, and the interpretation of human behavior lack consensus. Available evidence suggests that the anatomically modern human skeleton appeared well before many aspects of the subsistence and symbolic behavior that characterize recent foragers and that Middle Stone Age technology persisted longer in southern Africa than its northern hemisphere counterpart.

Key words

Middle Stone Age Late Pleistocene southern Africa modernHomo sapiens 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne I. Thackeray
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyUniversity of the WitwatersrandSouth Africa

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