Research in Higher Education

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 483–495 | Cite as

Wait-time in college classes taken by education majors

  • Orpha K. Duell
  • Douglas J. Lynch
  • Randy Ellsworth
  • Christopher A. Moore
Article

Abstract

Professors teaching education classes differed little from professors teaching noneducation classes in terms of the questions they asked and how long they paused after questions and students' responses. Fewer professor questions went unanswered in the education courses. Professors ask on average about 25 questions each class hour, the majority of which are higher-level. They pause about 2.25 seconds after questions and .45 seconds after student responses. These pauses suggest many students are effectively shut out of responding and are not provided the opportunity to elaborate their answers, even those to complex, divergent questions.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Orpha K. Duell
    • 2
  • Douglas J. Lynch
    • 2
  • Randy Ellsworth
    • 2
  • Christopher A. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of Counseling, Educationa, and School Psychology, College of EducationWichita State UniversityWichita

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