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Fitness facilitates sleep

  • Colin M. Shapiro
  • P. M. Warren
  • J. Trinder
  • S. J. Paxton
  • I. Oswald
  • D. C. Flenley
  • J. R. Catterall
Article

Summary

Eight army recruits were studied at the start, middle, and end of their initial 18-week training programme. At each point the subjects were studied for four consecutive nights in the sleep laboratory. Their sleep was characterized by the means of the recordings on the last two nights. Within 2 days of the sleep recordings (but never on the same day) each subject spent 2 non-consecutive days in the exercise laboratory. On the 1st day a maximum oxygen consumpton (\(\dot V_{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}} }\) max) measurement was performed on a treadmill and on the 2nd day a 24-min progressive exercise bicycle ergometer test was carried out with simultaneous venous sampling (for lactic acid measurements) and oxygen consumption recordings from which the lactate turn point (LTP) was calculated. LTP was used as a measure of fitness. Approximately 1 week after the above measures lean muscle mass as calculated by total body potassium estimation was obtained for each subject. Slow wave sleep (SWS) as a percentage of total sleep time increased significantly between the start and the measurements at 9 and 18 weeks, being 21.9%, 29.9%, and 28.5% respectively. Anaerobic threshold increased significantly (P<0.05) over the first 9 weeks and continued to increase to the end of the training period (P<0.001) using\(\dot V_{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}} }\) when lactate level was 2 mmol/l as a percentage of\(\dot V_{{\text{O}}_{\text{2}} }\) max. With increase in fitness, sleep onset latency and wake time during sleep decreased and sleep efficiency improved. The results suggest that as fitness increases sleep quality improves.

Key words

Fitness Exercise Sleep Training Restorative 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Colin M. Shapiro
    • 1
  • P. M. Warren
    • 2
  • J. Trinder
    • 3
  • S. J. Paxton
    • 3
  • I. Oswald
    • 1
  • D. C. Flenley
    • 2
  • J. R. Catterall
    • 2
  1. 1.Department PsychiatryRoyal Edinburgh HospitalEdinburghScotland
  2. 2.Department of Respiratory MedicineUniversity of EdinburghScotland
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of TasmaniaAustralia

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