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EMG scanning: Normative data

  • Douglas W. Matheson
  • Timothy P. Toben
  • Dorothy E. de la Cruz
Article

Abstract

Surface EMG was recorded from both right and left aspects of 18 muscle groups for the purpose of establishing a data base of normative EMG levels. A scanning electrode permitted easy and rapid EMG measurement from 52 male and 51 female college students, both sitting and standing. Several a posteriori analyses of variance revealed sex differences in the masseter, occipital, posterior cervical, upper trapezius, latissimus dorsi, and anterior tibialis. Similarly, there were side differences for the anterior temporalis, occipitalis, splenius capitus, trapezius, paraspinalis, and soleus. The analyses also revealed interactions among sex, position, and side for various measures on the trapezius. The data show that females tend to muscle brace more than males in the upper extremities. The study provides data for normative comparisons and helps to plan and interpret future EMG studies.

Key words

EMG scanning normative data scanning electrodes biofeedback muscle tension 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas W. Matheson
    • 1
  • Timothy P. Toben
    • 1
  • Dorothy E. de la Cruz
    • 1
  1. 1.University of the PacificStockton

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