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Journal of Genetic Counseling

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 235–260 | Cite as

The crane's foot: The rise of the pedigree in human genetics

  • Robert G. Resta
Article

Abstract

The standard pedigree used by geneticists is intimately connected to the history of genetics. Pedigrees drawn today are based on standards established in the early decades of the twentieth century. Those standards were established by geneticists who pursued an active interest in eugenics. The slightly different standards followed in America vs. England to some extent followed the stronger support of Mendelism by the Americans, as well as the individual preferences of the leading human geneticists in those countries.

Key words

pedigrees genetic counseling eugenics history of genetics 

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Copyright information

© National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert G. Resta
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Perinatal StudiesSwedish Medical Center SeattleSeattle

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