An evaluation of the perceived stress scale in two clinical populations

  • Lori Pbert
  • Leonard A. Doerfler
  • Diana DeCosimo
Article

Abstract

The relation of perceived stress and psychosocial dysfunction was examined in two clinical samples identifying stress as a personal problem. Perceived stress was significantly correlated with self-reported negative affect and physical symptoms. Negative and total major life event scores also were significantly correlated with self-reported negative affect and physical symptoms. However, the perceived stress scale and the life events measures were moderately correlated, indicating that the two scales assess different features of the stress experience. A major finding of this study was that perceived stress scores were significantly correlated with affective and physical symptoms even after the variance associated with life events had been partialed out.

Key words

perceived stress scale negative affect physical symptoms life events 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lori Pbert
    • 1
  • Leonard A. Doerfler
    • 2
    • 3
  • Diana DeCosimo
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine and Center for Health and FitnessUniversity of Massachusetts Medical CenterWorcester
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyAssumption CollegeWorcester
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Massachusetts Medical CenterWorcester
  4. 4.Division of General Medicine and Primary Care and Center for Health and FitnessUniversity of Massachusetts Medical CenterWorcester

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