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Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 45–52 | Cite as

Negative self-hypnosis

  • Daniel L. Araoz
Article

Abstract

A review of recent developments in psychotherapeutic methods of cognitive behavior therapy leads to the conclusion that negative self-hypnosis (NSH) is operative in problematic behavior. NSH is elucidated, and a counteractive, five-stage approach of self-hypnosis is proposed to effectively deal with NSH.

Keywords

Public Health Problematic Behavior Social Psychology Cognitive Behavior Therapy Behavior Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel L. Araoz
    • 1
  1. 1.C. W. Post CenterLong Island UniversityGreenvale

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