Computers and translation

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 239–267 | Cite as

The French National MT-Project: Technical organization and translation results of CALLIOPE-AERO

  • Christian Boitet
Article
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Abstract

The software and lingware aspects of the CALLIOPE-AERO system derive from those of the laboratory prototypes developed at GETA (Grenoble University).1 The basic MT software, ARIANE-78, has been augmented with a translator workstation and a lexical database system from which the MT dictionaries are generated. The architecture of the lingware was designed by Professor Bernard Vauquois. For the first time, development has begun with the systematic construction of two ‘static grammars’ for French and English, before any programming of ‘dynamic grammars’.

CALLIOPE-AERO aims at translating aviation manuals from French into English. The lingware, written in the SLLPs (Specialized Languages for Linguistic Programming) supported by ARIANE-78, now totals 22,500 lines for the grammars and 54,000 lines for the dictionaries (roughly 14,000 terms), which continue to expand rapidly.

In-house testing of CALLIOPE-AERO has begun at an industrial site. The overall quality of the translation results produced so far makes it quite probable that acceptability by translators and cost-effectiveness will be attained in a real setting.

Another system, CALLIOPE-COMP, is now in the development stage. Its aim is to translate computer-related material from English into French.

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Copyright information

© Paradigm Press, Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Boitet
    • 1
  1. 1.GETA at the University of Grenoble in FranceFrance

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