Cellular array processor CAP and applications

  • Mitsuo Ishii
  • Hiroyuki Sato
  • Morio Ikesaka
  • Kouichi Murakami
  • Hiroaki Ishihata
Article

Abstract

The general-purpose, highly parallel, cellular array processor (CAP) we developed features multiple-instruction stream, multiple-data stream (MIMD) processing and image display. Processor elements can number in several hundreds. The present system uses 256 processors. Each processor element consists of a general-purpose microprocessor, memory, and a special VLSI chip that performs parallel-processing-specific functions such as processor communication and synchronization. The VLSI has two 2M byte/s independent common bus interfaces for data broadcating and six 15M bit/s serial communication ports for local data communication. The chip also can process image data in real time for multiple processors. Use of the communication interfaces enables a variety of processor networks to be configured. One CAP application has been computer graphics, in which ray tracing is used to generate quality images.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mitsuo Ishii
    • 1
  • Hiroyuki Sato
    • 1
  • Morio Ikesaka
    • 1
  • Kouichi Murakami
    • 1
  • Hiroaki Ishihata
    • 1
  1. 1.Fujitsu Laboratories, Ltd., KawasakiKawasaki 211Japan

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