Parasitology Research

, Volume 75, Issue 7, pp 528–535 | Cite as

Comparative morphology of human and animal malaria parasites

I. Host-parasite interface
  • Ute Mackenstedt
  • Chariya R. Brockelman
  • Heinz Mehlhorn
  • Wolfgang Raether
Original Investigations

Abstract

Human and animal malaria parasites (Plasmodium falciparum, P. malariae, P. vivax, P. berghei, P. gallinaceum) were studied using special fixation and standardized methods, with special attention to their effects on host cells. Morphological alterations induced by the parasites in infected erythrocytes included knobs, invaginations, and caveola-vesicle complexes on the surface of the host cell and clefts, microvesicles, and small vesicles in the cytoplasm of the infected erythrocytes. ForP. malariae, the ultrastructural study revealed invaginations with associated microvesicles, but knobs did not occur on the surface of infected erythrocytes. The development of invaginations and microvesicles inP. malariae-infected erythrocytes corresponded to the morphological alterations induced byP. vivax. A new hypothesis concerning the origin of Schüffner's dots is discussed.

Abbreviations

bz

budding zone

c

cluster

cl

cleft

cv

caveolavesicle complex

e

erythrocyte

g

gametocyte

i

mvagination

k

knob

m

merozoite

mv

microvesicle

n

nucleus

p

pigment

pv

parasitophorous vacuole

sm

small vesicle

t

trophozoite

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ute Mackenstedt
    • 1
  • Chariya R. Brockelman
    • 2
  • Heinz Mehlhorn
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Raether
    • 3
  1. 1.Lehrstuhl für Spezielle Zoologie und ParasitologieRuhr-Universität BochumBochumGermany
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology, Faculty of ScienceMahidol UniversityBangkokThailand
  3. 3.Labor für Protozoologie und MykologieHoechst AGFrankfurt/M. 80Germany

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