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American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 371–386 | Cite as

Social support, life stress, and psychological adjustment: A test of the buffering hypothesis

  • Brian L. Wilcox
Article

Keywords

Social Support Social Psychology Health Psychology Life Stress Psychological Adjustment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References Notes

  1. 1. Wilcox, B. L. The role of social support in adjustment to marital disruption: A network analysis. In B. J. Hirsch & B. L. Wilcox (Chairs),Social support: Emerging directions in theory and research. Symposium presented at the meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Honolulu, May 1980.Google Scholar
  2. 2. Barrera, M., Jr. The development and application of two approaches to assessing social support. In B. J. Hirsch & B. L. Wilcox (Chairs),Social support: Emerging directions in theory and research. Symposium presented at the meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Honolulu, May 1980.Google Scholar
  3. 3. Wilcox, B. L.Filling in the stress construct: A focus on social support. Unpublished manuscript, University of Virginia, 1980.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian L. Wilcox
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Gilmer HallUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesville

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