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Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 61–74 | Cite as

Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) in inflammation: A cause and a cure

  • Sharon M. Wahl
Special Article

Keywords

Growth Factor Internal Medicine Infectious Disease Transform Growth Factor Transform Growth Factor Beta 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon M. Wahl
    • 1
  1. 1.Cellular Immunology SectionNational Institute of Dental Research, National Institutes of HealthBethesda

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