Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 271–286 | Cite as

The self-perceptions and attributions of attention deficit hyperactivity disordered and nonreferred boys

  • Betsy Hoza
  • William E. Pelham
  • Richard Milich
  • David Pillow
  • Katrina McBride
Article

Abstract

Compared the self perceptions and attributions of attention deficit hyperactivity disordered (ADHD) and control boys. The ADHD boys viewed themselves as no worse than control boys on self-perceived competence and global selfworth, especially when internalizing symptomatology was taken into account statistically through covariance analyses. In terms of attributions, the ADHD boys were more likely to take responsibility for social successes and less likely to take responsibility for social failures than the control boys. Although the ADHD boys scored significantly higher on the Children's Depression Inventory, this difference was no longer significant when items dealing with behavior, school, and social problems were excluded. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for understanding how the attributions and selfperceptions of ADHD boys may mediate their performance in challenging academic and social situations.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betsy Hoza
    • 2
  • William E. Pelham
    • 2
  • Richard Milich
    • 1
  • David Pillow
    • 2
  • Katrina McBride
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KentuckyLexington
  2. 2.Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicSt., Pittsburgh

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