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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 573–580 | Cite as

A comparison of children who receive and who do not receive permission to participate in research

  • Steven Beck
  • Lynn Collins
  • James Overholser
  • Karen Terry
Article

Abstract

In a study examining children's social competence in elementary school settings, the authors had the opportunity to compare children who received parental permission to participate to children who did not receive permission. Results indicated that children who were not involved in the study were more likely to be viewed by teachers as having unsatisfactory relationships with peers than children who were in the study. The present results suggest that investigators begin reporting the number of children who do not participate in a given study and begin examining whether minors who receive parental permission differ on important dimensions from minors who do not receive such permission. Ethical considerations of the present study are discussed.

Keywords

Elementary School Ethical Consideration Social Competence School Setting Parental Permission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Beck
    • 1
  • Lynn Collins
    • 1
  • James Overholser
    • 1
  • Karen Terry
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyOhio State UniversityColumbus

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