Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 20, Issue 2, pp 213–232

Single and combined effects of methylphenidate and behavior therapy on the classroom performance of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

  • Caryn L. Carlson
  • William E. PelhamJr.
  • Richard Milich
  • Joanne Dixon
Article

Abstract

Twenty-four boys with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) participating in an intensive summer treatment program each received b.i.d. placebo and two doses of methylphenidate (MPH, 0.3 mg/kg and 0.6 mg/kg) crossed with two classroom settings: a behavior modification classroom including a token economy system, time out and daily home report card, and a “regular” classroom setting not using these procedures. Dependent variables included classroom observations of on-task and disruptive behavior, academic work completion and accuracy, and daily self-ratings of performance. Both MPH and behavior modification alone significantly improved children's classroom behavior, but only MPH improved children's academic productivity and accuracy. Singly, behavior therapy and 0.3 mg/kg PMH produced roughly equivalent improvements in classroom behavior. Further, the combination of behavior therapy and 0.3 mg/kg MPH resulted in maximal behavioral improvements, which were nearly identical to those obtained with 0.6 mg/kg MPH alone.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caryn L. Carlson
    • 1
  • William E. PelhamJr.
    • 2
  • Richard Milich
    • 3
  • Joanne Dixon
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University of Texas at AustinAustin
  2. 2.Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicPittsburgh
  3. 3.The University of KentuckyLexington

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