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Human Ecology

, Volume 18, Issue 4, pp 441–455 | Cite as

Modeling rendille household herd composition

  • Eric Abella Roth
Article

Abstract

Previous analysis of Rendille household herd composition revealed a transition from camel to cattle ownership for sedentary impoverished Rendille pastoralists of northern Kenya. In an attempt to delineate determinants of livestock holdings, logistic regression analysis of 112 household herds from the Rendille settlement of Korr, Marsabit District, Kenya was undertaken. Results indicated that household wealth, measured in present livestock holdings, past drought losses, and livestock sales, formed better predictors of cattle ownership than did household characteristics pertaining to labor supply, wage earners, age-set membership, and birth order of household head. These results are discussed in light of pastoral strategies designed to minimize risk.

Key words

pastoralism East Africa household herds risk 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Abella Roth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada

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