Journal of Business Ethics

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 207–217 | Cite as

Should trees have managerial standing? Toward stakeholder status for non-human nature

  • Mark Starik
Article

Abstract

Most definitions of the concept of “stakeholder” include only human entities. This paper advances the argument that the non-human natural environment can be integrated into the stakeholder management concept. This argument includes the observations that the natural environment is finally becoming recognized as a vital component of the business environment, that the stakeholder concept is more than a human political/economic one, and that non-human nature currently is not adequately represented by other stakeholder groups. In addition, this paper asserts that any of several stakeholder management processes can readily include the natural environment as one or more stakeholders of organizations. Finally, the point is made that this integration would provide a more holistic, value-oriented, focused and strategic approach to stakeholder management, potentially benefitting both nature and organizations.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Starik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Strategic ManagementThe George Washington UniversityWashington D.C.USA

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