Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 287–299 | Cite as

Riboflavin as a tracer of medication compliance

  • Patricia M. Dubbert
  • Abby King
  • Stephen R. Rapp
  • Deborah Brief
  • John E. Martin
  • Mary Lake
Article

Abstract

Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the accuracy of urine ultraviolet fluorescent tests for riboflavin, which has been used as a tracer for medication compliance in several clinical drug trials. Observer accuracy in discriminating riboflavin-positive or negative urine samples was found to vary with the method of observation, dose of riboflavin, observer experience, and time postingestion. The results showed that, while the 5-mg dose used in previous clinical trials was too small to permit reliable assessment of compliance, larger doses of riboflavin could produce nearly 100% accuracy for minimally trained observers who used a matching-to-sample observation procedure. The findings are discussed in terms of the potential clinical and research applications of this type of simple but reliable compliance assessment procedure.

Key words

medication compliance adherence riboflavin 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia M. Dubbert
    • 1
  • Abby King
    • 1
  • Stephen R. Rapp
    • 1
  • Deborah Brief
    • 1
  • John E. Martin
    • 1
  • Mary Lake
    • 1
  1. 1.Veterans Administration and University of Mississippi Medical CentersJackson

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