Advertisement

Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 144–148 | Cite as

Antithrombin III in children with various renal diseases

  • Hiromu Fukui
  • Akira Taniguchi
  • Shinya Sakamoto
  • Singo Kawahara
  • Takeshi Matsunaga
  • Koji Taira
  • Satoshi Tanaka
  • Hidekazu Kamitsuji
Original Article

Abstract

Levels of antithrombin III (AT-III) activity and antigen in plasma and urine in children with renal diseases, and their correlation with the light microscopic findings of kidney tissue and the fluorescence of glomeruli, were investigated. AT-III activity in plasma was reduced slightly during the acute stage of acute glomerulonephritis and moderately in the relapse stage of nephrotic syndrome, whereas a small increase of AT-III antigen level in urine was noted in the acute stage of glomerulonephritis and considerably more was observed during the relapse stage of nephrotic syndrome. During the acute stage of glomerulonephritis or in some primary persistent glomerulonephritis (IgA nephritis, non-IgA nephritis), Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis and nephrotic syndrome, localization of small amounts of AT-III was noted on the capillary walls of glomeruli. These findings were in parallel with the proliferative changes of glomeruli. However, the AT-III localization did not change in parallel with the light microscopic findings or degree of the fluorescence of the fibrinogen/fibrin-related antigen. It was thought that the existence of AT-III antigen on the capillary walls of the glomeruli might be associated with the inhibition of excessive fibrin formation by AT-III.

Key words

Antithrombin III Acute glomerulonephritis Primary persistent glomerulonephritis Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis Nephrotic syndrome 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Egeberg O (1965) Inherited antithrombin deficiency causing thrombophilia. Thromb Diath Haemorrh 13: 516PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Peters M, Ten Cate JW, Breederveld C, Leeuw R de, Emeis J, Koppe J (1984) Low antithrombin III levels in neonates with idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome: poor prognosis. Pediatr Res 18: 273–276PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sorum Y, Handeland GF, Abildgaard U (1984) On the clinical significance of acquired antithrombin deficiency. Folia Haematol (Leipz) III 6: 797–805Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Laursen B, Frost L, Mortensen JZ, Hansen KB, Paulsen SM (1983) Acute fatty liver of pregnancy with complicating disseminated intravascular coagulation. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 62: 403–407PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kauffman RH, Graeff JD, Riveere GB de la, Es LA van (1976) Unilateral renal vein thrombosis and nephrotic syndrome. Am J Med 60: 1048PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Kauffman RH, Velktkamp JJ, Tilbung NH van, Es LA van (1978) Acquired antithrombin III deficiency in the nephrotic syndrome. Am J Med 65: 607PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Thaler E, Balzar E, Kopsa H, Pingera WF (1978) Acquired antithrombin III deficiency in patients with glomerular proteinuria. Haemostasis 7: 257PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jørgensen KA, Stoffersen E (1979) Antithrombin III and nephrotic syndrome. Scand J Haematol 22: 442PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lau SO, Tkachuck JY, Hasegawa DK, Edson JR (1980) Plasminogen and antithrombin III deficiencies in the childhood nephrotic syndrome associated with plasminogenuria and antithrombinuria. J Pediatr 96: 390PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Elidrissy ATH, Gader AMA (1985) Antithrombin III (AT-III) and fibrinogen levels in nephrotic syndrome in children. Haemostasis 15: 384–388PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Llach F (1985) Hypercoagulability, renal vein thrombosis, and other thrombotic complications of nephrotic syndrome. Kidney Int 28: 429–439PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Lee KY, Chan V, Chan TK (1979) The identification and localization of antithrombin III in human tissues. Thromb Res 14: 209PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Chan V, Chan TK (1979) Antithrombin III in fresh and cultured human endothelial cells: a natural anticoagulant from the vascular endothelium. Thromb Res 15: 209PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© IPNA 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiromu Fukui
    • 1
  • Akira Taniguchi
    • 1
  • Shinya Sakamoto
    • 1
  • Singo Kawahara
    • 1
  • Takeshi Matsunaga
    • 1
  • Koji Taira
    • 1
  • Satoshi Tanaka
    • 2
  • Hidekazu Kamitsuji
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsNara Medical CollegeNaraJapan
  2. 2.Hoechst Japan LimitedTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations