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Social mobility and hypertension among blacks

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Abstract

This paper considers the role of social mobility to hypertension among blacks. Using a nationally representative sample of the adult black population, this research finds no effects of intergenerational socioeconomic mobility. Minimal effects are found for geographic mobility; geographic moves bears a small positive relationship to hypertension. The implications for a theory of mobility effects on black health are discussed.

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This research was supported, in part, by an All University Research Initiation Grant from Michigan State University.

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Broman, C.L. Social mobility and hypertension among blacks. J Behav Med 12, 123–134 (1989). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00846546

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Key words

  • social mobility
  • hypertension
  • black Americans
  • geographical mobility