Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 117–127

The effects of acute exercise on subsequent cigarette smoking

  • Ovide F. Pomerleau
  • Herbert H. Scherzer
  • Neil E. Grunberg
  • Cynthia S. Pomerleau
  • James Judge
  • Joanne B. Fertig
  • Joseph Burleson
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF00846420

Cite this article as:
Pomerleau, O.F., Scherzer, H.H., Grunberg, N.E. et al. J Behav Med (1987) 10: 117. doi:10.1007/BF00846420

Abstract

The present study was conducted to examine the effects of acute aerobic exercise on smoking behavior. On alternate days, 10 healthy young smokers were subjected to half an hour of sustained high exercise (about 56% of maximum work capacity) or of low exercise (about 28% of maximum, simulating normal daytime activity). During the high-exercise condition, there were pronounced increases in physiological markers of physical activity such as mean work, heart rate, and lactic acid as well as elevations in circulating hormones (norepinephrine, epinephrine, and immunoreactive beta-endorphin and cortisol) known to be affected by vigorous exercise. Despite a trend toward decreased desire for cigarettes after the high exercise condition, there were no differences in plasma nicotine levels following the smoking of a usual-brand cigarette 35 min later. The sustained effects of the two exercise conditions were also similar: plasma cotinine levels 24 hr later (reflecting nicotine intake over the entire exercise day) revealed no significant differences between hight and low exercise.

Key words

cigarette smoking cotinine exercise nicotine stress hormones 

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ovide F. Pomerleau
    • 1
  • Herbert H. Scherzer
    • 2
  • Neil E. Grunberg
    • 3
  • Cynthia S. Pomerleau
    • 1
  • James Judge
    • 4
  • Joanne B. Fertig
    • 5
  • Joseph Burleson
    • 5
  1. 1.Behavioral Medicine Program, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Michigan School of MedicineAnn Arbor
  2. 2.Human Performance Laboratory, New Britain General Hospital, and Department of MedicineUniversity of Connecticut School of MedicineNew Britain
  3. 3.Department of Medical PsychologyUniformed Services University of the Health SciencesBethesda
  4. 4.Department of MedicineUniversity of Connecticut School of MedicineFarmington
  5. 5.Department of Behavioral BiologyWalter Reed Army Institute of ResearchWashington

Personalised recommendations