Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 137–156 | Cite as

Gender differences in cardiovascular reactivity

  • Stephanie V. Stone
  • Theodore M. Dembroski
  • Paul T. CostaJr.
  • James M. MacDougall
Article

Abstract

Pronounced cardiovascular reactivity to stress is a behavioral mechanism that may underlie the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease (CHD). Based on the greater incidence of CHD among males than among females, the purpose of the current investigation was to test the hypothesis that in young adults (ages 17–29), males (n=47) show more cardiovascular reactivity than females (n=61) to two stressors, a video game and cigarette smoking. Five of the six comparisons did not support the hypothesis: females were higher on heart rate and diastolic blood pressure reactivity to both Stressors; males were higher on systolic blood pressure reactivity to the video game only. The results suggest that females may be particularly physiologically reactive to cigarette smoking.

Key words

coronary heart disease gender reactivity 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephanie V. Stone
    • 1
  • Theodore M. Dembroski
    • 1
  • Paul T. CostaJr.
    • 2
  • James M. MacDougall
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Maryland Baltimore CountyCatonsville
  2. 2.Gerontology Research CenterNational Institute on Aging, National Institutes of HealthBethesda
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyEckerd CollegeSt. Petersburg

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