Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 43–49

Cardiovascular responses in Type A and Type B men to a series of stressors

  • Marcia M. Ward
  • Margaret A. Chesney
  • Gary E. Swan
  • George W. Black
  • Stanley D. Parker
  • Ray H. Rosenman
Article

Abstract

Fifty-six healthy adult males were administered the Type A Structured Interview and assessed as exhibiting either Type A (N=42) or Type B (N=14) behavior pattern. They were monitored for systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) responses during a series of six challenging tasks: Mental Arithmetic, Hypothesis Testing, Reaction Time, Video Game, Handgrip, and Cold Pressor. The results indicated that Type A subjects exhibited greater cardiovascular responses than did Type B subjects during some (Hypothesis Testing, Reaction Time, Video Game and Mental Arithmetic) but not all (Handgrip and Cold Pressor) of the tasks. These results are discussed in terms of previously reported findings on conditions that do and do not produce differences in Type A/B cardiovascular stress responses.

Key words

Type A behavior blood pressure heart rate stress 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcia M. Ward
    • 1
  • Margaret A. Chesney
    • 1
  • Gary E. Swan
    • 1
  • George W. Black
    • 1
  • Stanley D. Parker
    • 1
  • Ray H. Rosenman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioral MedicineSRI International (formerly Stanford Research Institute)Menlo Park
  2. 2.Department of Behavioral MedicineSRI InternationalMenlo Park

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