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Physiological factors in infantry operations

  • Joseph Knapik
  • William Daniels
  • Michelle Murphy
  • Patricia Fitzgerald
  • Frederick Drews
  • James Vogel
Article

Summary

Male infantry soldiers (n=34) were studied before, during, and after a 5-day simulated combat exercise. During the exercise, subjects were rated on their field performance by senior infantry non-commissioned officers. Prior to the exercise, direct measures of body composition and maximal oxygen uptake were obtained. Before and after the exercise the Army Physical Fitness Test and various measures of anaerobic capacity (Wingate and Thorstensson tests) and muscular strength (isometric and isokinetic) were obtained. Results showed no significant decrement in field performance during the exercise. Upper-body anaerobic capacity and strength declined following the exercise, al though the results for upper-body strength were not consistent on all measures. Field performance was significantly correlated with measures of upper-body anaerobic capacity and strength. Upper-body strength and anaerobic capacity appear to be important for infantry operations and subject to declines during combat operations.

Key words

Wingate test Thorstensson test Muscular strength Field performance 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Knapik
    • 1
  • William Daniels
    • 1
  • Michelle Murphy
    • 1
  • Patricia Fitzgerald
    • 1
  • Frederick Drews
    • 2
  • James Vogel
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental MedicineExercise Physiology DivisionNatickUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Army War CollegePhysical Fitness Research InstituteCarlisleUSA

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