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GeoJournal

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 357–363 | Cite as

Iran and the continuing crisis in the Persian Gulf

  • McLachlan Keith 
Article
  • 48 Downloads

Abstract

Iran is attempting to return to its pre-Islamic revolution stage of regional hegemony in the Persian Gulf. During the 1980's, Iran alienated itself from both superpowers — the USA and the USSR. More recently, Iran has began a process of regaining much of its international legitimacy. This includes the adoption of a neutral stance during the Gulf War of 1991, acting as a mediator in Afghanistan and by a — so far — policy of restrained intervention in the newly independent Central Asian Moslem states of the former Soviet Union. Iran continues to see itself as a powerful Middle Eastern state which has the right to manage affairs in the Persian Gulf. This will be difficult to achieve as long as Iran is perceived as a reactionary state by the USA and European powers, in their continued support for Saudi regional interests.

Keywords

Environmental Management Middle Eastern Continue Support Eastern State Regional Interest 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • McLachlan Keith 
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LondonSchool of Oriental and African StudiesLondonEngland

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