GeoJournal

, Volume 35, Issue 2, pp 119–122 | Cite as

The causal structure of vulnerability: Its application to climate impact analysis

  • Ribot Jesse C. 
Article

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ribot Jesse C. 
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Population and DevelopmentMacArthur Fellow, Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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