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GeoJournal

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 87–92 | Cite as

The Hadendowa Salif: Successes and failures of indigenous cultural institutions in managing the food system

  • Bakhit A. H. 
  • Hayati Omer 
Article

Abstract

The Hadendowa's customary law code, the Salif, used to regulate the social and economic behaviour of the Hadendowa, as well as their rational utilization of resources. Since the outbreak of the 1984 famine, however, the Hadendova have been depending on relief food, which has disrupted their Salif and rendered it uncapable of helping the Hadendowa to to cope with the current stress situation.

Keywords

Environmental Management Food System Rational Utilization Stress Situation Economic Behaviour 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bakhit A. H. 
    • 1
  • Hayati Omer 
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geography, Faculty of EducationUniversity of KhartoumOmdurmanSudan

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