Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 161–164

Increasing age is a risk factor for psychosis in the elderly

  • J. van Os
  • R. Howard
  • N. Takei
  • R. Murray
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/BF00790654

Cite this article as:
van Os, J., Howard, R., Takei, N. et al. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol (1995) 30: 161. doi:10.1007/BF00790654

Abstract

We examined the association between ageing and the administrative incidence rate of late onset (after age 59) non-organic, non-affective psychosis in two samples of patients aged 60 years or older who were first admitted to hospital in (1) The Netherlands between 1978 and 1992 (n=8010) and (2) nine regional health authorities in England and Wales (n=1777) between 1976 and 1978. There was a linear trend in the association between increasing age and first admission rates for non-organic, non-affective psychosis in the elderly, after adjustment for the possible confounding effects of time trend and gender, corresponding to an 11% increase in the incidence with each 5-year increase in age. These observations support a connection between degenerative brain processes and onset of non-affective psychosis in the elderly.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. van Os
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Howard
    • 3
  • N. Takei
    • 2
  • R. Murray
    • 2
  1. 1.Instilute of PsychiatryLondonUK
  2. 2.Institute of Psychiatry and King's College HospitalLondonUK
  3. 3.Institute of Psychiatry and Maudsley and Bethlem Royal HospitalLondonUK

Personalised recommendations