Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 48, Issue 5, pp 1338–1341

Restoration of vital function in monkeys after bleeding to death during hypothermia

  • V. A. Negovskii
  • V. I. Soboleva
  • N. L. Gurvich
  • K. S. Kiseleva
  • Sh. S. Machavariani
Pathological Physiology and General Pathology

DOI: 10.1007/BF00788343

Cite this article as:
Negovskii, V.A., Soboleva, V.I., Gurvich, N.L. et al. Bull Exp Biol Med (1959) 48: 1338. doi:10.1007/BF00788343
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Summary

Clinical death resulting from acute blood loss in monkeys was prolonged up to 20–30 minutes with the aid of hypothermia. Vital function was restored by means of centripetal arterial blood transfusion and artificial respiration; direct cardiac massage and elimination of defibrillation by electrical stimulation were used in a number of cases. Monkeys are, however, more sensitive to the hypoxia caused by bleeding to death than are dogs, even under hypothermic conditions. Thus, complete restoration of vital function was achieved only in 1 monkey out of the 4 which sustained a 30 minute period of clinical death. At the same time, when the monkeys recover, vital function is restored more rapidly than in dogs. The latter is evidently due to more perfect compensation.

Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau Enterprises, Inc. 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. A. Negovskii
    • 1
    • 2
  • V. I. Soboleva
    • 1
    • 2
  • N. L. Gurvich
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. S. Kiseleva
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sh. S. Machavariani
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of the Experimental Physiology of ResuscitationAMN SSSRMoscow
  2. 2.Institute of Experimental Pathology and TherapySukhumi

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