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Oecologia

, Volume 75, Issue 4, pp 502–506 | Cite as

Compensating effects to growth of carbon partitioning changes in response to SO2-induced photosynthetic reduction in radish

  • H. A. Mooney
  • M. Küppers
  • G. Koch
  • J. Gorham
  • C. Chu
  • W. E. Winner
Original Papers

Summary

Exposure of plants to SO2 reduced their photosynthetic performance due tio reductions in carboxylating capacity. Although the reduced carbon gain resulted in a lower growth rate of SO2-exposed plants over that of controls, their loss of potential growth was minimized because of proportional increases in allocation to new leaf material.

Key words

Carbon allocation Photosynthetic performance SO2 inhibition Growth analysis Radish 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. A. Mooney
    • 1
  • M. Küppers
    • 2
  • G. Koch
    • 1
  • J. Gorham
    • 1
  • C. Chu
    • 1
  • W. E. Winner
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Lehrstuhl für PflanzenökologieUniversität BayreuthBayreuthFederal Republic of Germany
  3. 3.Department of General ScienceOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA

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