Catalysis Letters

, Volume 14, Issue 3–4, pp 339–348 | Cite as

Application of Ru exchanged zeolite-Y in ammonia synthesis

  • W. Mahdi
  • U. Sauerlandt
  • J. Wellenbüscher
  • J. Schütze
  • M. Muhler
  • G. Ertl
  • R. Schlögl
Article

Abstract

Na-Y zeolite was cation exchanged with Ru(NH3)6Cl3 yielding at 25% exchange level a light-purple solid which was active in ammonia synthesis at atmospheric pressure. Pulse conversion experiments show that the catalyst stores nitrogen as it was observed with the conventional iron catalyst. At 810 K the conversion reached about 20% of the maximum conversion of the iron catalyst. The catalyst deactivated reversibly within 30 h due to agglomeration. The active species in the catalyst is most likely a cluster-like Ru metal particle prevented from sintering under the reducing conditions of catalysis by the zeolite framework.

Keywords

Ammonia synthesis Ru-zeolite metal clusters conversion measurements 

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Copyright information

© J.C. Baltzer A.G. Scientific Publishing Company 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Mahdi
    • 1
  • U. Sauerlandt
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Wellenbüscher
    • 1
  • J. Schütze
    • 1
  • M. Muhler
    • 1
  • G. Ertl
    • 1
  • R. Schlögl
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Fritz Haber Institut der Max-Planck GesellschaftBerlin 33Germany
  2. 2.Institut für Anorganische Chemie der UniversitätFrankfurt 50Germany

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