Environmental Geology

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 271–275 | Cite as

Information derived from soil maps: Areal distribution of bedrock landslide distribution and slope steepness

  • R. C. Lindholm
Original Papers

Abstract

Soil maps can be used to generate maps showing the areal distribution of bedrock. This technique is especially useful in heavily vegetated areas where weathering is intense and outcrops sparse. Broad lithologic categories that are readily distinguished include: diabase/basalt, sandstone, shale, limestone, conglomerate, and hornfels. Using soil maps is not a substitute for field work, but is a valuable tool to aid in making geologic maps. Soil maps can also be used to produce derivative maps showing slope steepness and landslide distribution.

Key words

Soil maps Areal distribution Slope steepness 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. C. Lindholm
    • 1
  1. 1.Geology Department, Bell HallThe George Washington UniversityWashington, DCUSA

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