Catalysis Letters

, Volume 1, Issue 11, pp 371–375 | Cite as

Oxidative coupling of methane: An inherent limit to selectivity?

  • Jay A. Labinger
Article

Abstract

Mechanistic considerations show that pressure must be taken into account in evaluating oxidative coupling catalyst performance, and predict an upper limit of around 30% yield of higher hydrocarbons at one atmosphere.

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Copyright information

© J.C. Baltzer A.G. Scientific Publishing Company 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay A. Labinger
    • 1
  1. 1.Contribution No. 7831 from the Division of Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringCalifornia Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA

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