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Clinical Social Work Journal

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 95–98 | Cite as

A response to “the emotional consequences of physical child abuse” by Annaclare van Dalen

  • Sharon Klayman Farber
Article
  • 37 Downloads

Abstract

The author responds to the article by Annaclare van Dalen (1989), disputing her statement that there is little in the literature about the emotional consequences of child abuse. The author reviews the pertinent literature, which is abundant. The author disagrees with van Dalen's statement that the child experiences physical abuse outside the body, and with the statement that the child experiences sexual abuse as pleasurable. In addition the author disagrees with van Dalen's sharp differentiation between physical abuse and sexual abuse, and proposes that sexual abuse be regarded as a variant of physical abuse.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Child Abuse Physical Abuse Emotional Consequence Physical Child Abuse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon Klayman Farber
    • 1
  1. 1.Hastings-on-Hudson

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